The Narrative of Synonymy

And the stars of heaven fell unto the earth, even as a fig tree casteth her untimely figs, when she is shaken of a mighty wind.

(Revelation 6:13) KJV

The peer review driven narrative starts with the desire that the Bible is wrong, the Earth is billions of years old, and there’s no possible way that the stars could, or would, fall to Earth.

Most people think that popular science (SciPop) has measured space. Most people also believe that the internal structure of the Earth has long been known. This is because SciPop is populated by Trekkies and managed by peer review.

In the Star Trek universe you can travel through wormholes in space and do a deep scan of a planet from close orbit. Peer review has been entwining what we believe about the capabilities of science with the visual appeal of SciFi since the 1960s. When we tell people that hell is at the center of the Earth it’s not uncommon to be told that cat-scans and x-rays from space have disproved hell.

Technically speaking the SciPop narrative is that our solar system is really acentric, having no center, because the system is traveling through space. The idea has been to build a mainstream belief that our planet is insignificant in the big picture. Even our sun is just a little one, and we’re like dust floating through the cosmos. All of this grew out of the arbitrary decision to regard the words sun and star as equivalent. It’s amazing what you can do with a little synonymy.

We’ve induced the rationale for how exoplanets that support human life are all over the place and how we’ll be able travel through wormholes for lunch at Deep Space 9. Sooner or later it will be real, so start believing it now.

– Peer Review

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