The Hawking Effect

O Timothy! Guard what was committed to your trust, avoiding the profane and idle babblings and contradictions of what is falsely called knowledge—

(1 Timothy 6:20) NKJV

One of our favorite books is “A Brief History of Time,” by Stephen Hawking. In this and his other books Hawking expands use of the scientific method as an inductive tool. He opened up the realm of plausibility. In so doing he redefined the term “scientific knowledge.”

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April 2

The Foundations of the Heavens

And the foundations of the wall of the city were garnished with all manner of precious stones. The first foundation was jasper; the second, sapphire; the third, a chalcedony; the fourth, an emerald; The fifth, sardonyx; the sixth, sardius; the seventh, chrysolite; the eighth, beryl; the ninth, a topaz; the tenth, a chrysoprasus; the eleventh, a jacinth; the twelfth, an amethyst.

(Revelation 21:19-20) KJV

Understanding how the heavens were constructed allows us to interpret scripture and account for empirical observations of the cosmos, including 85% of the mass of the universe that popular science (SciPop) can’t find.

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The Windows of Heaven

In the six hundredth year of Noah’s life, in the second month, on the seventeenth day of the month, on that day all the fountains of the great deep burst forth, and the windows of the heavens were opened.

(Genesis 7:11) ESV

The windows of heaven are described in scripture as physical structures which may be opened or closed. This is possible because the firmament is a sphere of rigid crystal on the edge of space.

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The Hawking Effect

O Timothy! Guard what was committed to your trust, avoiding the profane and idle babblings and contradictions of what is falsely called knowledge—by professing it some have strayed concerning the faith. Grace be with you. Amen.

(1 Timothy 6:20-21) NKJV

One of our favorite books is “A Brief History of Time,” by Stephen Hawking. In this and his other books Hawking expands use of the scientific method as an inductive tool. He opened up the realm of plausibility. In so doing he redefined the term “scientific knowledge.”

Continue reading “The Hawking Effect”